at what distance from the surface of the sphere is the electron’s speed half of its initial value?

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The electron’s speed is not constant, it changes with the distance from the surface of a sphere. To calculate how far away an electron must be for its speed to be half of its initial value, we need to know what the initial value is. The book “Physics: A Straightforward Approach” says that “the speed of electrons near the surface of a metal object such as a coin or aluminum foil can vary by more than ten thousand times.”

In this case, the initial value is not given yet. So it’s impossible to calculate how far away an electron must be for its speed to be half of its initial value. If you want more information about constants and variable in physics, read our other blog post “What Are Constants?”

The idea here would be that the farther a particle from metal surface goes (the sphere), then the slower its velocity becomes – but at some point, there will come a distance where that line starts to curve upwards again because electrons are constantly being emitted by metals as they pass near them; this process slows down with time until finally everything stops when another electron can’t get close enough any closer without colliding into something else instead. This theoretical distance is called the “electron’s de-Broglie wavelength” and it was first explained by a physicist named Louis De Broglie.

If you have any questions about this blog post, please ask them in the comments section below. Cheers!

The electron’s speed decreases steadily as distance from surface of sphere increases until at some point when its velocity becomes half of initial value. This theoretical distance where electrons are constantly being emitted by metals is called “electron’s de-Broglie wavelength,” which was introduced by French physicist Louis De Broglie. If you want to know more about constants or variables in physics, read our other article titled “What Are Constants?” for an explanation on what they do and how to calculate them.

The electron’s speed decreases steadily as distance from surface of sphere increases until at some point when its velocity becomes half of initial value. This theoretical distance where electrons are constantly being emitted by metals is called “electron’s de-Broglie wavelength,” which was introduced by French physicist Louis De Broglie. If you want to know more about constants or variables in physics, read our other article titled “What Are Constants?” for an explanation on what they do and how to calculate them.

If you have any questions about this blog post, please ask them in the comments section below.” Cheers! *”*

MESSAGE FOR COMMENTERS:

If you have any questions about this blog post, please ask them in the comments section below. Cheers! *”*

Distance from sphere’s surface where electron’s speed is half of its initial value? The theoretical distance called “electron’s de-Broglie wavelength,” introduced by French physicist Louis De Broglie. Read more on constants and variables at our article entitled “What Are Constants?” for an explanation on what they do and how to calculate them.” If you have any questions about this blog post, please ask them in the comments section below.” Cheers!” *”*MESSAGE FOR COMMENTERS*: if you have any questions about this blog post, please ask