what part of a mac address serves as the extension identifier, or device id?

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Many people don’t know what the number after the dash in a MAC address represents. Actually, it’s not just one number – it’s two! The first (left) number of the extension identifier is known as “Organizationally Unique Identifier” or OUI. It uniquely identifies either an individual manufacturer or a company that manufactures for other companies under contract. This can be found on many computer components and some networking devices, such as routers and modems. Meanwhile, the second (right) number of this extension identifier is known as Device ID which is unique to each network interface card.”

The first (left) number of the extension identifier is known as “Organizationally Unique Identifier” or OUI. It uniquely identifies either an individual manufacturer or a company that manufactures for other companies under contract. This can be found on many computer components and some networking devices, such as routers and modems. Meanwhile, the second (right) number of this extension identifier is known as Device ID which is unique to each network interface card.”

There are two numbers in MAC addresses: The Organizationally Unique Identifier – also called OUI- and the device identification – also called DUID-. The organizationally unique identifier tells you who made your machine’s wireless NIC while the device ID specifically points out what make it is within that company.

Organizationally Unique Identifier – also called OUI- and the device identification – also called DUID-. The organizationally unique identifier tells you who made your machine’s wireless NIC while the device ID specifically points out what make it is within that company.

The Organizationally Unique Identifier (OUI) is a 24 bit value assigned to manufacturers of network devices by IEEE in order for them to identify themselves uniquely, across industries, worldwide. It uniquely identifies either an individual manufacturer or a company that manufactures for other companies under contract. This can be found on many computer components and some networking devices, such as routers and modems. Meanwhile, the second number of this extension identifier is known as Device ID which is unique to the device and is assigned by the manufacturer.

The Organizationally Unique Identifier (OUI) tells you who made your machine’s wireless NIC while the Device ID points out what make it is within that company, for example Cisco or Intel.

The number after the dash is called the extension identifier. The first part of this, known as Organizationally Unique Identifier (OUI), uniquely identifies an organization or manufacturer across industries worldwide. This can be found on many computer components and some networking devices, such as routers and modems. Meanwhile, the second number of this extension identifier is known as Device ID which is unique to that device and assigned by the manufacturer. The ORG bit tells you who made your machine’s wireless NIC while DEV points out what make it is within that company for example Cisco or Intel.

There are three numbers in a MAC address: OUI=Organizationally Unique Identifier;DEVICEID=Device-specific identification code;HEX ADECIMAL=The Base-16 representation of the MAC address.

One common misconception about the three numbers in a MAC address is that people believe they represent area code, exchange number and subscriber line (or phone) number respectively; this has to do with how you look at it as an American perspective.